Cognitive Diary CBT Self-Help ® Mobile App

 
Cognitive Diary CBT Self-Help
Cognitive Diary CBT Self-Help
Cognitive Diary CBT Self-Help

Overview
 

Device: ,
 
Developer: Excel At Life, LLC
 
Description: This app is a stress, anxiety, emotion, and negative thinking management tool, which helps you learn how to recognize thought patterns that interfere with your ability to attain your life goals. A diary format is used for daily “homework” on changing non-productive thinking that can lead to stress, anger, interpersonal problems, jealousy, low self-esteem, low motivation, decreased satisfaction in life, and other side effects of negative, reactive thinking.
 
Applicability
100%


 
Usability
100%


 
Interoperability
0%


 
Security
100%


 
Validity
100%


 
Reliability
100%


 
Engagement
0%


 
Our Rating
71%
71/100


User Rating
no ratings yet

 


Bottom Line

This app is a stress, anxiety, emotion, and negative thinking management tool, which helps you learn how to recognize thought patterns that interfere with your ability to attain your life goals. A diary format is used for daily “homework” on changing non-productive thinking that can lead to stress, anger, interpersonal problems, jealousy, low self-esteem, low motivation, decreased satisfaction in life, and other side effects of negative, reactive thinking.

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Posted March 23, 2015 by

 
Our Review
 
 

The goal of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is to help you learn how to change negative thinking to more positive and growth-centered thinking for attaining your goals in life. CBT is done in the therapy session; however, it is most effective when continued outside of the therapist’s office by you doing the work daily. This app can be used as part of your clinical therapy work or as a stand-alone tool if you who want to learn stress and anxiety reduction through the use of journaling and self-reflection. Its features include extensive information about the app, how to use the app, how to set preferences and passwords. Preference settings allow you to customize your experience, and the app can be used anytime and anywhere you feel the need to do your journaling, review goal setting, or any other CBT work done in the app. The pages are simply designed, so as not to detract from the content. You can share your entries with your clinician during the therapy session.

 

Once you set your preferences, the app does the work of implementing these functions. Setting preferences include creating a password, a daily reminder, data backup and restoration, send/don’t send data to clinician, and save to the SD card on your device. You can also customize the text for visual impairment, privacy, and ease of reading, if needed.

 

While this app can be downloaded to multiple devices, there appears to be some difficulty with syncing entries between devices. Past users downloaded the app to a tablet and phone, attempted to save the entry to a storage app, and sync it across devices; however, the data did not transfer between devices. The users then attempted to email the entry to themselves, then save the entry into the storage app, but it could not be opened for reading. The app does have the option for syncing the data; therefore, you will need to explore your particular devices’ capabilities more in depth to increase interoperability of this app.

 

Terms of Use state that the data entered by you will not be shared or released to anyone, and there is an option for “opting out” of allowing the app to collect data on your country of residence, as well as setting a password to protect your data. Excel At Life, LLC, the developer, refers you to their website through the app’s page for the full privacy policy which covers apps developed by them.

 

A link logo on the main page directs you to the group’s website, where you can read articles written and published by the Excel At Life group related to stress, anxiety, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and change. The app also includes a Referral List of providers in 10 states who use this app with their own clients. A direct link is provided to the developer’s website, where you are able to read published research related to the app’s ability to function as stated in the description.

 

The app performs the functions for which it was developed, which is to act as a coach for the client receiving CBT in therapy with the clinician. The developer has placed settings on the app for feedback, suggestions, and app rating by users. This feature allows you to report problems in real-time so that the developer group can make needed adjustments to the format. Your feedback is important to the developers.

 

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Does the app’s set of features adequately cover the range of tasks required to satisfy an actual need?
Does the app “meet workflow requirements and ultimately save time for the user?” Is the app free from “interface clutter, suboptimal eye-thumb coordination, steep learning curve, battery draining of the host device, etc.”?
Can the “app on one device share data with other apps and/or other devices?” Can the app “accept security assurances generated by some other app?”
Does the app have the following capabilities to maintain security- “privacy, not losing data, not being diverted, not being altered by an unauthorized agent, making sure there is no an impersonator communicating with the client/clinician”? Does the app meet HIPAA and FCC security requirements?
Does scientific evidence support the app itself rather than just the concept upon which the app is based?
Does the app accomplish a defined task without crashes, error messages, or complications? Does it perform consistently over time?

About the Author

Karen Wall, MA, RN-BC, BSN
Ms. Wall is a Psychiatric Registered Nurse with the VA at Palo Alto. Her duties include educating nurses, clinicians, and patients about technology to assist with mental health.

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