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In-Person to Videoconference-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Australian Randomized Controlled Trial

Mood and Anxiety Disorders

Do you still have doubts about using video teleconferencing for mood and anxiety disorders? Reported in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, an Australian team from the School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University of Technology, in Perth documented the efficacy of increasing access to care via video teleconferencing. 

A total of 26 clients with  a primary diagnosis of a mood and anxiety disorders were recruited through a university clinic and randomly assigned to 12 sessions of CBT treatment either in-person or via video teleconference. Treatment involved individualized CBT formulations specific to the presenting diagnosis. 

Symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life were assessed using questionnaires before, after, and at 6 week follow-up. Secondary outcomes at this 6-week post treatment assessment included working alliance and client satisfaction.

Retention was similar across treatment conditions. Interestingly, there was one more client in the videoconferencing condition at post treatment and at follow-up. The findings of this controlled trial indicate that CBT was effective in significantly reducing symptoms identified above, with no significant differences between the two groups.

Researchers were: Daniel R Stubbings, PhD; Clare S Rees, PhD; Lynne D Roberts, PhD; Robert T Kane, PhD

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